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School of Law

SCOTUS Mapper Library

Welcome to the SCOTUS mapper library! Click on the links below to view high-resolution versions of the maps, complete with footnotes. If you are interested in creating maps for the SCOTUS Mapping Project, please email Colin Starger.

Doctrine Author Description

FRCP 8

Pleadings doctrine

Scott Dodson This map traces the evolution of the pleadings standard under Rule 8 for the FRCP from 1957-2011. This map was developed by Prof. Scott Dodson of UC Hastings and uses a different schema to trace the relative liberality of pleadings opinions over time. For annotated discussion, click here.

Fifth Amendment

Same-Sex Marriage

Colin Starger On June 26, 2013, the Court announced its landmark decision in United States v. Windsor. By a 5-4 margin, Windsor struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) on the grounds that it violated the Fifth Amendment. The decision has great implications for Due Process and Equal Protection jurisprudence. This map shows the basic doctrinal justification for Justice Kennedy's majority decision. For academic discussion of this map, please click here and download. 

Fourth Amendment

Arrestee DNA Testing

Colin Starger On June 3, 2013, the Court handed down its much anticipated Maryland v. King decision that upheld the constitutionality of Maryland's DNA Collection Act authorizing the collection and analysis of the DNA of persons arrested for, but not convicted of, certain serious crimes. This map shows the competing doctrinal arguments advanced by the King majority and dissent. For academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Commerce Clause

Health Care

Colin Starger In  NFIB v. Sebelius , a majority of the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act in 2012. However, Chief Justice Roberts, joined by four other justices, found the act exceeded Congress's powers under the Commerce Clause.  This map  shows the history of the relevant Commerce Clause debate.  For academic discussion of this map, please   click here .

Fourth Amendment

Exclusionary Rule
Colin Starger In Herring v. United States, heard in 2009, a majority of the Supreme Court held that application of the Exclusionary Rule was not required given the particular violation of the Fourth Amendment. In dissent, Justice Ginsburg called for a return to "a more majestic conception of the Fourth Amendment." This map shows the history of the relevant Fourth Amendment debate. For academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Due Process

Incorporation

Colin Starger In McDonald v. City of Chicago, from 2010, a majority of the Supreme Court held that the 14th Amendment incorporated the Second Amendment so that it applies in the states. In dissent, Justice Stevens argued that the Second Amendment right should not be incorporated. This map shows the history of the relevant Due Process incorporation debate. For academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Due Process

Economic Liberty

Colin Starger In West Coast Hotel v. Parrish, decided in 1937, a majority of the Supreme Court famously reversed its precedent, which had impeded New Deal economic legislation. This map shows the origins of this historic debate over economic liberty. For academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Due Process

Brady v. Maryland (I)

Colin Starger In Brady v. Maryland, decided in 1963, a majority of the Supreme Court found that criminal defendants had a due process right to receive exculpatory evidence in the possession of prosecutors. This map shows the historical origins and continued evolution of the doctrinal debate over this critical right. For extended academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Due Process

Brady v. Maryland (II)

Colin Starger This map shows how Brady doctrine evolved from 1963-2012. It is a simplified version of the map immediately above and is intended as a more practical reference to the doctrine.

Metadoctrine

Stare Decisis/ Overruling

Colin Starger

This map provides a reference to the Supreme Court's key decisions regarding its own doctrine of stare decisis. It is thus a map of the Court's "precedent about precedent."

For extended academic discussion of this map, please click here.

Right to Privacy

Origins of Roe v. Wade

Colin Starger

The 1973 Roe v. Wade case recognizing a woman's right to an abortion remains one of the Supreme Court's most controversial decisions. This map shows the different due process, equal protection, and 4th amendment lines relied upon by the majority in reaching its landmark decision.

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