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An Innovative Curriculum That Puts Theory Into Practice

This hands-on, practical, experiential program offers an interdisciplinary education in all aspects of family law. All courses provide opportunities for students to put subject-matter content into action in a real-world context. The program culminates in a summer capstone class, in which students work collaboratively through a family law case, from initial client consultation to case resolution.

 

Fall Courses

Spring Courses

Psychology, Child Development and Mental Health in Family Law Matters

(3 credits)

The Craft of Problem-Solving and Advocacy in Family Law Cases

(3 credits)

Financial Foundations for Family Lawyers

(3 credits)

Understanding the Business of Practicing Family Law

(3 credits)

Summer Capstone

Working Through a Family Law Case—Start to Finish

(4 credits)

 

Please direct questions about the Post-J.D. Certificate in Family Law to Professor Barbara Babb, Director of the Post-J.D. Certificate in Family Law, at 410.837.5661 or bbabb@ubalt.edu.

Advanced Credit Toward the Certificate

Applicants who meet the program’s advanced standing requirements may receive a course waiver for the 3-credit course “The Craft of Problem-Solving and Advocacy in Family Law.” Advanced standing may be granted to:

  • UB School of Law graduates who completed the Family Law Area of Concentration as part of their J.D. program.
  • Graduates from other law schools who completed, within the last five years, 15 credits of family law or related coursework with a GPA of 2.67 or higher in those courses.

Program Requirements

To receive a Post-J.D. Certificate in Family Law, students will be required to complete 16 credit hours of prescribed coursework and pass all courses taken in the certificate program. Except for advanced credit toward the certificate, the coursework must be completed after a student has received a J.D.

The program’s curriculum consists of the following required courses:

  • Psychology, Child Development and Mental Health in Family Law Matters (3 credits)

    This course is designed to help family law practitioners understand the mental health needs of adults and children, the stages of child development, and the roles they play in family law representation. Participants will learn how to engage mental health professionals and other court experts, how to interpret their reports and testimony, and how to interact with them effectively. The course also will help participants identify and develop the self-care skills necessary to maintain their own mental and emotional health when engaged in family law practice. Teaching methods will include presentation, discussion and experiential learning activities.

  • Financial Foundations for Family Lawyers (3 credits)

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the financial matters that lawyers confront in family law cases. The course will cover financial fundamentals, such as types of property and income; taxation; and the preparation of financial facts, such as valuation practices and the preparation of key documents, among other topics. 

  • The Craft of Problem-Solving and Advocacy in Family Law (3 credits)

    This course is designed to provide a hands-on approach to representing children, parents and other potential caregivers through mediation, arbitration, and negotiation; speaking; and writing. This is a practice-oriented class, using real-life examples. Students will be required to prepare quick-turnaround written and oral presentations that will be critiqued by practitioners and judges.

  • Understanding the Business of Practicing Family Law (3 credits)

    This course is designed to help attorneys understand the business of family law: how to attract clients, how to decide which clients to accept and how to manage client relationships, as well as how to staff a practice and manage its finances.In addition, the course will familiarize students with the challenges of a family law practice, including clients who are often emotionally vulnerable, which places additional responsibilities on the practitioner. The course also will discuss methods that help the practitioner establish appropriate boundaries and maintain his/her equilibrium. 

  • Working Through a Family Law Case—Start to Finish (4 credits)

    This course is designed to provide students with a detailed road map of the progression of a family law case. It will help family law practitioners to deepen their understanding of the important intersections that they and their client must cross at each phase of the case. The course will cover the progress of a family law case from first client contact, to key decision points, to preparing the case for settlement or trial. This hands-on, real-world course will give students a wide range of opportunities to learn and practice strategies for effectively managing the process. The heart of the course will be a semester-long, creative simulation of a family law case, which offers a real-world experience of the challenges and key intersections of a family law case.