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Prof. Lasson: DeVos Invitation Is In Keeping with Free Speech Rights

Prof. Lasson: DeVos Invitation Is In Keeping with Free Speech Rights

September 15, 2017

Kenneth Lasson, professor in the University of Baltimore School of Law, writes in a Baltimore Sun op-ed that UB's invitation to have U.S. Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speak at Commencement is in keeping with the understanding that "universities should countenance different, even controversial, points of view."

Prof. Keyes: With DACA Ending, We Need Immigration Reform Now

Prof. Keyes: With DACA Ending, We Need Immigration Reform Now

September 7, 2017

Elizabeth Keyes, associate professor in the University of Baltimore School of Law and director of the school's Immigrant Rights Clinic, writes in The Baltimore Sun that the drawing down of the DACA program should prompt Congress to craft a legislative solution to the nation's pressing problems with immigration.

UB Law Faculty Speak Out on Arpaio Pardon

UB Law Faculty Speak Out on Arpaio Pardon

August 29, 2017

Faculty from the University of Baltimore School of Law are speaking out on the recent presidential pardon of former Arizona sheriff Joseph Arpaio.

Prof. Grossman: Our Understanding of American History Does Not Require the Glorification of Its Evils

Prof. Grossman: Our Understanding of American History Does Not Require the Glorification of Its Evils

August 22, 2017

In an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, Steven P. Grossman, the Dean Julius Isaacson Professor in the University of Baltimore School of Law, writes that the ongoing controversy over statues depicting Confederate soldiers and politicians reveals a weakness in American thinking about the lessons of history.

Prof. Hatcher: System Views Inmates, Families as a 'Revenue Opportunity'

Prof. Hatcher: System Views Inmates, Families as a 'Revenue Opportunity'

August 16, 2017

Quoted in The Atlantic, University of Baltimore School of Law Professor Daniel Hatcher says the American prison system treats inmates and their families as a "revenue opportunity." Noting that jails and prisons use "video visitation" technology - provided by private contractors and charged to prisoners up to $1 per minute plus fees - Hatcher says the technology "is a link in the whole system that sees inmates," and the "broader vulnerable family" as a "revenue opportunity."

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